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MUST Have Accessories From the Groovy Era

Fads | November 19, 2018

Vogue 1970 Charlotte Rampling, British actress, wearing a matching knit sweater and skirt, a wide brimmed hat by Halston and shiny boots by Charles Jourdan. (Photo by Arnaud de Rosnay/Condé Nast via Getty Images)

Getting dressed is something we all do each day. Anybody can get up, put on a pair of pants, a shirt or a dress. Simply put, that is called "putting on clothes."  Add a few baubles, bangles or beads to a simple outfit and you then you have yourself a "clothing ensemble!"

Fashion accessories have been around since the beginning of time, or so it would seem and were initially worn by the privileged as a symbol of their status.

Queen Victoria

Throughout history, fashion accessories have been crafted and worn to make a statement of sorts. The very wealthy were known to wear brilliant headpieces and jewelry made of precious metals and gemstones. Only the upper crust could afford such extravagances and they were very easy to spot. It was their way of saying, “look at me!” And… trust me… people looked!

Fast forward to the '60s and '70s… groovy fashion accessories had become somewhat less expensive although just as socially valuable and notable.

Fashion accessories fall into a few different categories, i.e. hats, footwear, jewelry, gloves, scarves/ties, belts/buckles, and in some cases, “walking aids.” That’s right… some people find it stylish to carry a walking stick or cane just to complete their look.

Below you will find some of the “must have” fashion accessories from the groovy era… they were the finishing touches on that timeless groovy look!

Groovy Fashion Footwear

Footwear isn’t necessarily an accessory in and of itself. I mean... you will probably wear shoes without thinking about it. Now, if you were interested in stepping (pun intended) up your game in the groovy era, you may have worn Jack Purcell tennis shoes, Wallaby’s, Thom McAn earth shoes/chunky platforms or patent leather go-go boots! With the exception of the go-go boots, men and women were both wearing the same styles. Wallaby’s had those gum soles that looked filthy and disgusting after the first time you wore them but that was just part of their charm!

Groovy belts and belt buckles could make or break the entire outfit!

Belts have always had a way of making a huge statement about a person and their style. Back in the groovy era, women were wearing all sorts of belts including chain link, macramé and leather. Some were wide and some were thin, but they were hugely popular and not necessarily worn with belt loops. These belts weren’t designed or worn to keep your pants from falling down… they were worn to get attention. 

Men made their own fashion statement by changing out their belt buckles; the bigger, the BETTER! Some of these impressive belt buckles weighed as much as several pounds and ironically contributed to your pants falling down.

Mood rings, chokers, turquoise and puka shells were must have groovy accessories.  If you didn't already have a puka shell necklace, chances are you came home from the beach with one at some point.

Worn by both men and women, dog tags, POW and MIA bracelets of missing and deceased soldiers were considered legit jewelry during the Vietnam War and beyond! 

Groovy hats!

Women were wearing the classic crocheted hat in the '60s and '70s; many of them homemade. They were also wearing anything that resembled any hat Stevie Nicks ever wore. Nicks made many fashion statements with her iconic hats. Hats weren’t just for women, but men were really into their hair back in the day and didn’t want to mess it up. When they did wear hats, it was usually a baseball cap, beanie or the classic fedora.

Fashion styles have come and gone over the years and if you wait long enough, they usually come back around. Many of these accessories, we remember so well, spoke for themselves and actually defined us; although looking back now… we often ponder, “what was I thinking?”  

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Rebeka Knott

Writer

Rebeka grew up in the 1960’s & 1970’s and has always subscribed to the theory that a positive attitude will take you far! She is a wife and mother of 3 with a fun-loving spirit, believing that family and relationships are invaluable.