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Louise Fletcher: The Woman Who Brought A Villain To Life

Entertainment | September 22, 2021

Louise Fletcher, who was born on July 22, 1934, in Birmingham, Alabama. Her parents were both deaf. Her father, the Reverend Robert Capers Fletcher, founded mo...

The "We Are Family" Pirates And The Anthem of '79

Music | September 20, 2021

In 1979, the Pittsburgh Pirates rode the catchy tune, “We Are Family” by “Sister Sledge” to become one of the most unlikely champions in sports history. With a soundt...

Mother Teresa Wins The 1979 Nobel Prize

Icons | September 18, 2021

Mother Teresa accompanied by children at her mission in Calcutta, India (Photo by Tim Graham/Corbis via Getty Images) For an individual to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, the ...

The Bloody Tet Offensive Marked A Turning Point In Vietnam

Editor Picks | September 16, 2021

The Vietnam War bore witness to endless brutality but the Tet Offensive of 1968 probably saw the worst of it. On the most important holiday on the Vietnamese...

Son Of Sam And A Summer Of Terror

Editor Picks | September 14, 2021

From the summers of 1976-1977, the young people of Queens and the Bronx were on edge. During this time period, David Berkowitz shot and killed six people and wounded seven more using...

The Momentous Berkeley Free Speech Movement Of 1964

Culture | September 12, 2021

The Berkeley Free Speech Movement of the 1960s arose in response to restrictions enacted by the University of California, Berkeley. Those restrictions included rece...

Barbara Walters: Changing The Face Of Television News

Icons | September 10, 2021

American broadcast journalist Barbara Walters looks at film negatives with an unidentified man behind the scenes at NBC Studios, New York, New York, 1966. (Photo by ...

President Lyndon Johnson's War On Poverty

Icons | September 8, 2021

On January 8, 1964, President Lyndon Johnson declared his war on poverty. As he proclaimed during his Union address, "Our aim is not only to relieve the symptoms of poverty, ...

Bloody Sunday: A Massacre During A Civil Rights March

Culture | September 6, 2021

British troops marching arrested citizens toward detention on Bloody Sunday 30th January 1972 (Photo by William L. Rukeyser/Getty Images) In 1969, Derry, the secon...

The 1962 University of Mississippi Riots That Changed The World

Culture | September 5, 2021

The 1962 riots at the University of Mississippi campus marked a turning point for racial equality in the region. For a state that featured the confedera...

Silent Movie: Slapstick In The Seventies

Entertainment | September 2, 2021

In 1926, Brooklyn native Mel Brooks was born. He got his start as a writer and comic for Sid Caesar’s Your Show of Shows, which ran from 1950-1954, where he worked alongside N...

The Grooviest Afros Of The "60s and "70s

Culture | August 31, 2021

The ‘60s and ‘70s brought many groovy influences into the world but none groovier than the Afro. In reality, the bouncy, effervescent hairstyle represented so much more than a...

Jazzercise: The Beginnings Of A Fitness Craze

Culture | August 29, 2021

Jazzercise was born after second-wave feminism was underway, and it helped to revolutionize fitness for women; its impact continues to be felt today. Prior to the 1960s, ...

The Orginal Mini Cooper

Fads | August 27, 2021

Endless ill-conceived sports cars account for much of Britain’s automotive history, however, the original Mini Cooper stands apart. Voted the “European Car of the Century” in 1999 by 130 motor...

The Poor People's Campaign

Culture | August 25, 2021

On January 8, 1964, Lyndon B. Johnson addressed the nation in the State of the Union Address, proposing legislation to help combat poverty in America. The poverty rate at that point was aro...

The Harlem Cultural Festival

Music | August 23, 2021

Source: (The Everett Collection/Pop Sugar). In the Summer of 1969, Woodstock became the music festival to remember. At the time, other youth-oriented festivals, like Monterey and Newport w...

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