45 Eerie Photos Captured Behind-The-Scenes

By Sarah Norman | September 15, 2023

His Herman Munster Getup Made Fred Gwynne Sweat Like Crazy

A peek behind the scenes or an untold story can reveal so much more about our favorite shows and movies. Why did Mary Tyler Moore wear that silly wig on her new show, and who were those Hanson brothers in Slap Shot? These are the mysteries of the screen (big and small) that stay with us for years, seemingly never to be solved. But there are explanations and anecdotes -- everything has some backstory or secret origin. What was in the bottle before Barbara Eden (Jeannie) moved in? What's George Harrison doing in that Monty Python movie? And what is up with the mask that Michael Myers wears -- is it really a Star Trek thing? Take a moment to dig deeper, and you might find the fact or tale that makes you enjoy a series or film even more.

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Source: IMDB

You didn't just stroll on to the Munsters set and shoot your scenes -- hours of makeup application, for the cast members, was required for each episode. Herman Munster’s costume was extremely bulky and unbearably hot. In order to keep him cool enough for his health and comfort… and to keep his heavy makeup from melting, a stagehand would use an air compressor to shoot cool air into his costume in between scenes. Despite all of their efforts, the actor consistently lost weight due to excessive sweating. 

Actress Yvonne De Carlo had her own hot-and-heavy struggle: her wig reportedly weighed about 20 pounds. Her transformation to Lily Munster required two hours in the makeup chair, and the results were horrifying -- to her, at least. The first time she saw herself made up as Lily, the veteran actress broke down crying, asking "So it's come to this?" The shock wore off, though, and over time, she came to understand the show better, and to love it.

Richard Dreyfuss Spends Most Of 'American Graffiti' Trying To Find Suzanne Somers

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Source: IMDB

In American Graffiti, the high school graduate Curt (Richard Dreyfuss) glimpses a beautiful blonde woman driving a white Ford Thunderbird, and immediately becomes obsessed with her. His obsession isn't unjustified -- when he looks at her for that brief moment, she returns his friendly gaze and appears to mouth the words "I love you." For the rest of the film, he's on a quest to find her, although he is frequently distracted by side adventures, which tends to happen to teens cruising the strip on a Saturday night.

What viewers often don't know -- and indeed couldn't have known when the movie was released -- is that the briefly-glimpsed blonde was played by Suzanne Somers. Though Somers would soon become a big star thanks to Three's Company, she wasn't famous at all in 1973. In fact, "Blonde in T-Bird" was Somers' first credited screen role.