15 Genius Slogans And Jingles From The '60s and '70s

By Terry Claypoole
Bell's 'Reach Out And Touch Someone' campaign, circa 1979. Source: Reddit

Many advertising slogans and jingles of the 1960s and '70s are still with us today, for better or worse. Even if the companies that used them have moved on to other verbiage, we'll never forget what they used to tell us. "Slinky -- fun for a girl and a boy," "Reach out and touch someone," "How many licks?," and "Mikey likes it." In fact, a famous line about gentle dishwashing liquid describes advertising's effect on our vulnerable brains -- as Madge the manicurist said, "you're soaking in it." Slogans and jingles of the '60s and '70s became so familiar that we can't imagine life without them -- even if we wish we could. Blame it on the Mad Men of Madison Avenue, those deviously clever folks who developed catchy phrase after catchy phrase to push their clients' goods, services and ideas upon us. 

By the '60s and '70s nearly every home in the country had a television set, complete with rabbit ears. Televisions of this era got about 3, maybe 4 channels on a clear day and had to be operated manually, i.e. getting up and walking across the room to turn it on/off and change channels. If the reception was bad, dad went to the kitchen to retrieve a piece of aluminum foil to wrap around the antenna in hope of clearing up the “snow” on the set.

During the groovy era, people didn’t watch the amount of television we watch today. Kids spent their free time during the days and evenings playing outside and only came indoors when they were hungry, or it got dark out. Television was not what it is today.

These days, thanks to cable television and satellite dishes, we have the world at our fingertips with hundreds of channels of everything from sports, high fashion, game shows and the list literally goes on and on.

Remember when television commercials were short and sweet? There were maybe 2 or 3 in a row, and that was a lot. Commercials weren't always seen as necessary evils and kids always had their favorites.